Incollect 10-18
midwest edition
What's trending in the midwest? Industrial design
Oct 27, 2017
Taylor Barker

For its new report, “The Most Popular Design Styles in the U.S.,” online furniture company Joybird analyzed Google search trends to discover the most desired styles by state. Across the Midwest, industrial was the most popular design, coming in as the top selection in four of the region’s states, while Victorian was a close second, with three states. EAL chatted with a few Midwest designers to get their take on the results and find out what else they see trending in their design communities.

What's trending in the midwest? Industrial design
The Joybird report shows each state identified by its ‘winning’ style.

Corey Damen Jenkins is a Michigan-based interior designer who thinks there are a few reasons why the industrial aesthetic is resonating with his clients. His state is one of the four where industrial was the most popular style, according to the study.

“For one, it’s a masculine look that has a transitional, youthful appeal,” he says. “Also, many people who are purchasing refurbished apartments and condos in cities like Chicago and Detroit are finding that the spaces already have raw, textural elements like concrete floors, steel ‘factory-style’ windows and exposed ductwork.”

Industrial is also ruling in Iowa, where designer Amanda Reynal is based. Reynal herself tends to design in more traditional aesthetics, but she understands why industrial is having its moment in Des Moines. “Reclaimed wood floors and the modern farmhouse look are very popular here. Downtown Des Moines is growing quickly and industrial design feels urban and edgy in the city,” she notes.

As prevalent as industrial design is in his city, Chicago designer Dan Rak believes it is possible to incorporate the trend without going over the top. “I think the best results are achieved when the industrial references are more nuanced,” he says. “For me, it can be as simple as a metal band with rivets along the outer edge of a cocktail table, a blackened-iron table base or a reclaimed-wood dining table top. When balanced with softer, more luxe elements like velvets and wools, the look can be both ‘industrial’ and cozy.”

What's trending in the midwest? Industrial designMany people who are purchasing refurbished apartments and condos in cities like Chicago and Detroit are finding that the spaces already have raw, textural elements like concrete floors, steel ‘factory-style’ windows and exposed ductwork.” —Corey Damen Jenkins

What else are these designers noticing in the Midwest? Reynal is pleasantly surprised to see more colorful interiors making their way to the Midwest after defaulting to whites and grays the past few years; Jenkins sees younger clients leaning toward more traditional design that is more approachable than what their parents or grandparents might have had; and Rak has found that his clients are ready to take the plunge into cement tile.

Find Joybird’s full report HERE.

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