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Thirty-two landscape architects elevated to “fellow” status
Jan 8, 2015

Fellowship is among the highest honors the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) bestows on members, and at 2014's ASLA Annual Meeting and Expo, which recently took place in Denver, 32 members joined the elite club.
The designation of Fellow is conferred on accomplished individuals that have been full members of ASLA for at least 10 years. Each fellow must be recommended to the Council of Fellows by the Executive Committee of their local chapter, the Executive Committee of ASLA, or the Executive Committee of the Council of Fellows.
The following members have received the fellowship designation this year:
    
From left: Nivera, Arterburn, Asakura
Mario Nievera, of Nievera Williams Design, received his nomination from the Florida Chapter of ASLA. According to the Chapter, “he consistently puts into action his belief that landscape architects have a responsibility to educate clients and the public on how landscape design excellence shapes healthy, memorable and sustainable places to live, work, play and congregate.”
William Tary Arterburn, of Studio Outside, received his nomination from the Texas Chapter. With a career spanning four decades, “he is an inspiration to students and fellow practitioners alike,” according to the nomination.
Keiji Asakura, of the Asakura Robinson Company, received his nomination from the Texas Chapter. According to the Chapter, “he devotes himself to a profusion of service projects while also forging a distinguished professional career.”
    
From left: Beckham, Bishop, Conger
Hunter Beckham, of SWT Design, received his nomination from the St. Louis Chapter. He spearheaded securing the federal legislative approval and funding for the Historic American Landscape Survey, as well as was an early promoter of and contributor to the Sustainable Sites Initiative.
Axel Bishop, of Design Concepts, received his nomination from the Colorado Chapter. According to the chapter, he is a leading advocate promoting sustainable landscapes, storm water management, and learning landscapes in the West.
Kevin Conger, of CMG Landscape Architecture, received his nomination from the Northern California Chapter. According to the Chapter, “his sustained focus on the improvement of San Francisco's open public space has established deep relationships among sustaining organizations and public agencies.”
    
From left: Findlay, Guthrie, Hollinger
Douglas Findlay, of PWP Landscape Architecture, received his nomination from the Northern California Chapter as well. Chapter members regard him as the leading voice in the integration of design into the coordination of highly complex landscape architectural projects, preserving the integrity of every project’s design concept through to its completion.
Jennifer Guthrie, of Gustafson Guthrie Nichol, received her nomination from the Washington Chapter. “Her distinguished portfolio of projects and strong leadership skills have built and sustained one of the world’s leading design firms, produced some of the most influential landscape works of the new century, and shaped how emerging professionals approach landscape architecture,” according to the nomination.
Mark Hollinger, of Costello, Hollinger & Moore—JMP Golf Design Group, received his nomination from the Northern California Chapter. According to the Chapter, “he is internationally renown for a consistently strong integration of dramatic landscape elements forged into his golf course design concepts.”
     
From left: Hough, Howe, Hummel
Mark H. Hough, of Duke University, received his nomination from the North Carolina Chapter. According to the nomination, his impact on the profession extends beyond shepherding the lush, Olmsted Brothers-designed university campus into the 21st century while protecting its rich heritage. As one of the “strongest, most influential voices for his profession, he exemplifies the importance of broadening the definition of what it is to be a landscape architect.”
Daniel Anthony Howe, with the City of Raleigh, received his nomination from the North Carolina Chapter as well. He is the “embodiment of both planning and landscape architecture in urban design, sustainability, responsible development, and environmental protection in one of the nation’s fastest-growing and most innovative cities,” according to the nomination.
Peter Hummel, of Anchor QEA, received his nomination from the Washington Chapter. According to the Chapter, his work with the vibrant, rapidly growing, international, multi-disciplinary environmental consulting firm earned him a nomination.
    
From left: Mikyoung, Kroll, Lavallee
Mikyoung Kim, of Mikyoung Kim Design and the Rhode Island School of Design, received her nomination from the Boston Society. She “addresses pressing environmental issues and celebrates the beauty of our collective human experience through contemporary materials and technologies,” according to the nomination.
Michael Kroll, of Miller Legg, received his nomination from the Florida Chapter. His empirical understanding of ecosystems is “unparalleled, as is his ability to apply that knowledge to restore the precious, widely diverse and intricately interdependent natural systems of the Everglades,” according to the nomination.
Andrew Lavallee, of AECOM, received his nomination from the New York Chapter. According to the Chapter, “his vision of landscape architecture is as an organizing discipline to encourage optimal outcomes in the public realm.”
     
From left: Loheed, Martin, McCann
Patricia Loheed, of Earthos-Institute and Boston Architectural College, received her nomination from the Boston Society. She is a well-recognized practitioner, educator, and researcher whose “leadership in the establishment of the BAC accredited program has made landscape architecture education accessible for a diverse range of students,” according to the nomination.
Eugenia Martin, of CYP Studios, received her nomination from the Ohio Chapter. According to the Chapter, her leadership, experience, and vision for making the world a better place through low impact bike and pedestrian transportation is coupled with an “unbridled passion” for landscape architecture and the engagement of fellow design professionals.
Jacinta McCann, of AECOM, received her nomination from the Northern California Chapter. She leads her firm’s landscape architecture, master planning, urban design, and environmental planning practice and is responsible for 1,700 people throughout the Americas, Europe, Asia, the Middle East and Australia.
     
From left: Milbrun, Miller, Murphy
Lee-Anne Milburn, of Cal Poly Pomona, received her nomination from the Southern California Chapter. She is “a scholar, communicator, teacher, mentor, and advocate for the profession of landscape architecture,” according to the nomination.
Elizabeth Miller, of the National Capital Planning Commission, received her nomination from the Potomac Chapter. A longtime advocate of innovative public policy, planning and urban design initiatives, “she works on the front line of emerging urbanism, smart growth, security design, and sustainability movements,” according to the nomination.
Richard Murphy Jr., of Murphy Logistics, received his nomination from the Minnesota Chapter. According to the Chapter, “throughout his career as a supply-chain logistics leader, he has been the ultimate ambassador for the profession.”
    
From left: Nichol, Nolan, Powell
Shannon Nichol, of Gustafson Guthrie Nichol, received her nomination from the Washington Chapter. Her “mastery of the art, stewardship and social responsibility of design practice has enriched and recharged communities, advanced understanding among municipalities and allied professionals and consistently motivated design professionals to push boundaries,” according to the nomination.
Christopher Nolan, of the Central Park Conservancy, received his nomination from the New York Chapter. As the chief landscape architect of the public space that represents the founding of landscape architecture in America, he has “dedicated his career to upholding the unwavering commitment to design excellence established by Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux,” according to the nomination.
Richard Powell, with the New York Department of Public Service, received his nomination from the New York Upstate Chapter. According to the Chapter, his stewardship of ASLA finances for 30 years prepared him to guide the Society through the most challenging financial times in its history.
     
From left: Reckord, Rogers, Rottle
Terrance Reckord, of MacLeod Reckord, received his nomination from the Washington Chapter. He believes that “design need not be stylistic, but should reflect client and community goals and core values as well as the intrinsic qualities of the site and context,” according to the nomination.
Sam Rogers, with the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, received his nomination from the Tennessee Chapter. According to the nomination, during his four-decade career, he has served the profession through “education, practice and advocacy/volunteer initiatives.”
Nancy Rottle, of the Green Futures Research and Design Lab and the University of Washington, received her nomination from the Washington Chapter. As a landscape architect and educator, she has “focused on how to generate, test and share knowledge to elevate the appreciation and stewardship of the environment,” according to the nomination.
     
From left: Royster, Shurtz, Staeheli
John Parke Royster, of Big Muddy Workshop, received his nomination from the Great Plains Chapter. According to the Chapter, his sustained leadership through his environmental, organizational, community and design efforts has “strengthened landscape architect licensure, provided inspiration to organizations throughout Nebraska and enhanced the quality of built landscapes and people’s lives.”
Stephen Shurtz, with the City of Baton Rouge, received his nomination from the Louisiana Chapter. His volunteer service has made him a highly visible proponent of landscape architecture and urban forestry.
Margaret Rose Staeheli, of SvR Design Company, received her nomination from the Washington Chapter. According to the Chapter, she is one of the Northwest’s most effective proponents of sustainable design, particularly in the wise use and management of water. She also “demonstrates a commitment and record of successful project implementation that has shown an ever-larger number of design professionals, government managers and private individuals how they, too, can be effective stewards of the landscape and the resources it encompasses.”
  
From left: Walker, Witten
David Walker, of PWP Landscape Architecture, received his nomination from the Northern California Chapter. According to the Chapter, his projects span the U.S., Europe, Asia and Australia, and his vision is clearly represented in the firm's extensive portfolio.
Thomas Witten, of PBR HAWAII & Associates, received his nomination from the Hawaii Chapter. He leads a preeminent design firm skillfully and has “advanced the profession through his fervent efforts to establish a professional degree program at the University of Hawaii,” according to the nomination.
To learn more about each of these fellows, click here.

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